Friday, 7 September 2012

Antimicrobials Alter Intestinal Bacteria Composition in Swine, Researchers Find

ScienceDaily (Sep. 4, 2012) — Researchers from the University of Minnesota's College of Veterinary Medicine, concerned about the use of antibiotics in animal production, have found that antimicrobial growth promoters administered to swine can alter the kind of bacteria present in the animal's intestinal track, resulting in an accelerated rate of growth and development in the animals.

Antibiotics are routinely administered to swine to treat illness and to promote larger, leaner animals.

The results of the study, conducted by Richard Isaacson, Ph.D., microbiologist and professor within the University of Minnesota's College of Veterinary Medicine, alongside his U of M and University of Illinois research teams, were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

To arrive at their results, the researchers tracked the effects of the antimicrobial Tylosin. The effects were observed in the feces of commercial pigs on two farms in southwestern Minnesota.


Continued:
 http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120904150104.htm

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