Sunday, 29 September 2019

Discovery of an endangered species in a well-known cave raises questions


SEPTEMBER 24, 2019

You'd think there'd be no way someone could newly discover an endangered species hanging out in Fern Cave in the Paint Rock River valley of Jackson County, so close to Huntsville, home to thousands of spelunkers exploring every cave, nook and cranny.
But Matthew Niemiller and colleagues did.
In a discovery documented in a paper in the journal Subterranean Biology, Dr. Niemiller, an assistant professor of biological sciences at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), found a specimen of the Alabama Cave Shrimp Palaemonias alabamae while doing a biological survey of Fern Cave in summer 2018 as part of a team of four.
The endangered shrimp had previously only been discovered in six caves in four cave systems in Madison County.
"Fern Cave is the longest cave in Alabama, with at least 15 miles of mapped passage and five to seven distinct levels," Dr. Niemiller says. The cave features a 437-foot deep pit and exploring most of its lower levels is reserved only for the very fittest, since the trip involves an arduous journey including drops to be rappelled.
Dr. Niemiller and team's route to their discovery was no easy feat, either. The team entered the cave's bottom level via the Davidson Entrance at the base of Nat Mountain on the Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge. The section of Fern Cave is only dry enough for exploration without scuba gear at the height of summer. Otherwise, it takes a dive to explore its flooded passages.

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